News aggregator

Growers offered free <b>soil</b> testing

blog postings on 'soil' - Wed, 2011-12-14 22:42
WESLACO -- Farmers in Hidalgo, Cameron and Willacy counties are encouraged to take part in a free soil testing program to help the environment and their bottom lines, according to officials with the Texas AgriLife Extension ...
Categories: Soil Science

Rapid late Pleistocene/Holocene uplift and coastal evolution of the southern Arabian (Persian) Gulf

Quaternary Research Articles - Wed, 2011-12-14 22:09
Publication year: 2011
Source: Quaternary Research, Available online 14 December 2011

Warren W. Wood, Richard M. Bailey, Brian A. Hampton, Thomas F. Kraemer, Zhong Lu, ...

The coastline along the southern Arabian Gulf between Al Jubail, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Dubai, UAE, appears to have risen at least 125 m in the last 18,000 years. Dating and topographic surveying of paleo-dunes (43–53 ka), paleo-marine terraces (17–30 ka), and paleo-marine shorelines (3.3–5.5 ka) document a rapid, > 1 mm/a subsidence, followed by a 6 mm/a uplift that is decreasing with time. The mechanism causing this movement remains elusive but may be related to the translation of the coastal area through the backbasin to forebulge hinge line movement of the Arabian plate or, alternatively, by movement of the underlying Infracambrian-age Hormuz salt in response to sea-level changes associated with continental glaciation. Independent of the mechanism, rapid and episodic uplift may impact the design of engineering projects such as nuclear power plants, airports, and artificial islands as well as the interpretation of sedimentation and archeology of the area.

A late Pleistocene glacial chronology from the Kitschi-Kurumdu Valley, Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan), based onBe surface exposure dating

Quaternary Research Articles - Wed, 2011-12-14 22:09
Publication year: 2011
Source: Quaternary Research, Available online 14 December 2011

Roland Zech

Surface exposure dating has become a helpful tool for establishing numeric glacial chronologies, particularly in arid high-mountain regions where radiocarbon dating is challenging due to limited availability of organic material. This study presents 13 newBe surface exposure ages from the Kitschi-Kurumdu Valley in the At Bashi Range, Tien Shan. Three moraines were dated to ~ 15, 21 and > 56 ka, respectively, and corroborate previous findings that glacial extents in the Tien Shan during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 were limited compared to MIS 4. This likely documents increasingly arid conditions in Central Asia during the last glacial cycle. Morphological evidence in the Kitschi-Kurumdu Valley and a detailed review of existing numeric glacial chronologies from the Tien Shan indicate that remnants of the penultimate glaciation (MIS 6) are preserved, whereas evidence for MIS 5 glacier advances remains equivocal. Reviewed and recalculated exposure ages from the Pamir mountains, on the other hand, reveal extensive MIS 5 glacial extents that may indicate increased monsoonal precipitation. The preservation of MIS 3 moraines in the Tien Shan and the southern Pamir does not require any monsoonal influence and can be explained alternatively with increased precipitation via the westerlies.

Status of <b>Soil</b> Contamination in India | Water and Megacities

blog postings on 'soil' - Wed, 2011-12-14 19:52
Soils are critical environment where rock, air and water interface. Consequently, they are subjected to a number of pollutants due to different anthropogenic activities (Industrial, agricultural, transport etc.) (Facchinelli et al. ...
Categories: Soil Science

More In House

Paul Ramsey - Wed, 2011-12-14 17:50
Hot on the heels of my post about doing work in house, InfoWorld's Deep End column takes a look at build-vs-buy.
Relying solely on support contracts and generic solutions is a good way to self-limit the agility and performance of any business. In short, more gurus equals less hand-wringing and stress all around.In an era when software is eating the world, information agility is key to competitiveness (or, in government terms, "effective service delivery"), when competitors are investing heavily in brain power, why would any organization dumb itself down?

Boosting <b>soil</b> water holding capacity can increase profits <b>...</b>

blog postings on 'soil' - Tue, 2011-12-13 19:45
Soil water holding capacity is a term that all farmers should know to optimize crop production.
Categories: Soil Science

Sugar as a <b>Soil</b> Supplement | Doug&#39;s Organic Solutions <b>...</b>

blog postings on 'soil' - Tue, 2011-12-13 15:45
Sugar you add to the soil will instead feed soil microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi. These naturally occurring microbes are nature's recyclers; they help to nourish plants by breaking down the bits of organic debris in ...
Categories: Soil Science

Sick <b>soil</b> in C.R. | TheGazette

blog postings on 'soil' - Tue, 2011-12-13 12:30
Study finds 2 banned chemicals widespread in local soil.
Categories: Soil Science

Are burnt sediments reliable recorders of geomagnetic field strength?

Quaternary Research Articles - Tue, 2011-12-13 03:18
Publication year: 2011
Source: Quaternary Research, Available online 12 December 2011

Manuel Calvo-Rathert, Ángel Carrancho, Florian Stark, Juan José Villalaín, Mimi Hill

This study tests if burnt soils and sediments can provide reliable records of geomagnetic field strength at the time of burning by carrying out an experiment to reproduce the prehistoric use of fire on a clayish soil substratum. Rock magnetic experiments showed that in the upper 0–1 cm of the central part of the burnt surface, remanence is a thermoremanent magnetization carried by single-domain magnetite and that samples are thermally stable. Fourteen specimens from that area were subjected to paleointensity experiments with the Coe method (1967). An intensity of 42.9 ± 5.7 μT was estimated below 440°C, whereas at higher temperatures magneto-mineralogical alterations were observed. Corresponding successful microwave intensity determinations from two specimens gave a mean value of 47.6 μT. Both results are in reasonable agreement with the expected field value of 45.2 μT. Burnt soils of archeological fires thus have the potential to record accurately the paleofield strength and may be useful targets for archeointensity investigations. Coincident results obtained from two different paleointensity determination methods support this conclusion.

Environmental changes in southeastern Amazonia during the last 25,000 yr revealed from a paleoecological record

Quaternary Research Articles - Thu, 2011-12-08 23:46
Publication year: 2011
Source: Quaternary Research, Available online 7 December 2011

Barbara Hermanowski, Marcondes Lima da Costa, Hermann Behling

New pollen, micro-charcoal, sediment and mineral analyses of a radiocarbon-dated sediment core from the Serra Sul dos Carajás (southeast Amazonia) indicate changes between drier and wetter climatic conditions during the past 25,000 yr, reflected by fire events, expansion of savanna vegetation and no-analog Amazonian forest communities. A cool and dry last glacial maximum (LGM) and late glacial were followed by a wet phase in the early Holocene lasting for ca. 1200 yr, when tropical forest occurred under stable humid conditions. Subsequently, an increasingly warm, seasonal climate established. The onset of seasonality falls within the early Holocene warm period, with possibly longer dry seasons from 10,200 to 3400 cal yr BP, and an explicitly drier phase from 9000 to 3700 cal yr BP. Modern conditions with shorter dry seasons became established after 3400 cal yr BP. Taken together with paleoenvironmental evidence from elsewhere in the Amazon Basin, the observed changes in late Pleistocene and Holocene vegetation in the Serra Sul dos Carajás likely reflect large-scale shifts in precipitation patterns driven by the latitudinal displacement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone and changes in sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic.

California Science and Technology Policy Fellowships

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

The California Council on Science and Technology (CCST) is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2012-2013 California Science and Technology Policy Fellowships based in Sacramento. The S&T Policy Fellowship, a unique one-year professional development opportunity, provides the selected fellows with hands-on experience working with the California Legislature to incorporate science and technology into public policy.  Eligible applicants will be Ph.D.-level (or equivalent) scientists and engineers who have a sincere interest in California current events, the state legislative process, and a strong desire to learn how policy decisions are made. Deadline 29 Feb. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

IIASA Young Scientists Summer Program

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

IIASA's annual Young Scientists Summer Program (YSSP), now in its 35th year, is a three-month research program for advanced students who are ideally approximately two years away from receiving a PhD or equivalent, and whose interests correspond with IIASA's ongoing research.  The 2012 program starts on June 1, 2012, and ends on August 31, 2012. In order to be considered, applicants must commit to staying for the entire program. The application period for the 2012 YSSP runs through 16 Jan. During this time you can create a new application, edit an existing application, and submit a completed application to the program. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

NCR-SARE Announces 2012 Graduate Student Grants

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

2012 NCR-SARE Graduate Student Grants available online. Read full announcement here. Graduate students enrolled at colleges or universities in the North Central Region can submit proposals for up to $10,000 to fund sustainable agriculture projects that will be part of their educational programs. NCR-SARE expects to fund about 15 projects in the twelve-state North Central Region. Funded proposals have contributed to farmer or rancher profitability, environmental quality, and the enhancement of the quality of life of farmers or ranchers, rural communities, and society as a whole. NCR-SARE strongly encourages students to involve farmers and ranchers in their Graduate Student Grant projects. Potential applicants can contact Beth Nelson at schre002@umn.edu or 612-626-4436. Proposals are due in the NCR-SARE office in St Paul, MN by 26 Jan.

Categories: Soil Science

Urban Waters Small Grants

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is soliciting proposals from eligible applicants for projects that will contribute to improved water quality in urban areas. The goal of the Urban Waters Small Grants is to fund research, studies, training, and demonstration projects that will advance the restoration of urban waters by improving water quality through activities that also support community revitalization and other local priorities. In general, projects should promote a comprehensive understanding of local water quality issues; identify and support activities that address these issues at the local level; engage, educate and empower communities surrounding the urban water body; and benefit surrounding communities including those that have been adversely impacted by the water pollution issues affecting the urban water body. Deadline 23 Jan. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers Program

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

The Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers (I/UCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The centers are catalyzed by a small investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the center. Each center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the center faculty. An I/UCRC contributes to the Nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an I/UCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context. Deadline 6 Mar. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

Science & Technology Fellow(s)

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

MCC has a requirement for the services of an institution to set up and run a Science and Technology Fellowship Programthat will select and identify high quality candidate(s) with science, technology, and/or engineering background capable of supporting MCC's core mission. Deadline 22 Dec. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

Sustainable Chesapeake: A Community-Based Approach to Stormwater Management

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is seeking applications proposing trans-disciplinary, integrated research that will advance scientific and practical understandings of how to promote and sustain effective, community-based stormwater management for reducing water-borne pollution entering Chesapeake Bay. EPA is specifically interested in funding research projects that engage lay persons and scientific experts in the co-development, trial, and objective assessment of innovative, locally tailored solutions to shared stormwater problems. Deadline 11 Jan. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

Local Partners Program

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

USAID intends to award approximately 3-5 grants providing funding for 1 to 3 years under this APS. Total funding expected to be available is approximately $3 to 4 million dollars per year. USAID/Peru seeks to achieve the following development objectives: (1) a sustainable economic and social model is adopted by communities in targeted areas vulnerable to coca cultivation, and (2) natural resources are sustainably managed in targeted areas. Through the LPP, we envision multiple sub-programs or awards in the following area: Alternative Development, Natural Resource Management, and Basic Education as it relates to intercultural bilingual education. Deadline 29 May. Read full announcement here

Categories: Soil Science

Will Congress finish FY 2012 spending bills?

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

FY 2012 spending bills. Today, the House will move forward and vote on a motion to begin the conference on the Military Construction-VA (HR 2055) measure, which has been targeted as the vehicle for the nine spending bill omnibus package. Lawmakers hope to complete the conference as early as this Thursday. To achieve this, Congressional appropriators and leadership plan on including the eight other overdue appropriations bills on the Military Construction-VA spending bill which has already passed in both chambers. If successful, this approach would allow Congress to complete the FY 2012 appropriations bills before the current continuing resolution (PL 112-55) expires Dec. 16. Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle and upper and lower chambers have made predictions for the success of this approach ranging from impossible to very probable. Only time will tell if the legislative branch of our government can do its job.  Stay tuned… 

Categories: Soil Science

Super Committee admits defeat

SSSA Science Policy News - Wed, 2011-12-07 20:00

On 21 Nov, the Co-Chairs of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, Representative Jeb Hensarling and Senator Patty Murray, released the following statement. "After months of hard work and intense deliberations, we have come to the conclusion today that it will not be possible to make any bipartisan agreement available to the public before the committee’s deadline. Despite our inability to bridge the committee's significant differences, we end this process united in our belief that the nation's fiscal crisis must be addressed and that we cannot leave it for the next generation to solve.  We remain hopeful that Congress can build on this committee’s work and can find a way to tackle this issue in a way that works for the American people and our economy. We are deeply disappointed that we have been unable to come to a bipartisan deficit reduction agreement, but as we approach the uniquely American holiday of Thanksgiving, we want to express our appreciation to every member of this committee, each of whom came into the process committed to achieving a solution that has eluded many groups before us. Most importantly, we want to thank the American people for sharing thoughts and ideas and for providing support and good will as we worked to accomplish this difficult task.We would also like to thank our committee staff, in particular Staff Director Mark Prater and Deputy Staff Director Sarah Kuehl, as well as each committee member's staff for the tremendous work they contributed to this effort.  We would also like to express our sincere gratitude to Dr. Douglas Elmendorf and Mr. Thomas Barthold and their teams at the Congressional Budget Office and Joint Committee on Taxation, respectively, for the technical support they provided to the committee and its members." 

Categories: Soil Science